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I realized a few days ago that every time I sit down at work, I do a few things after unlocking my computer. First, I open up Firefox, then I open up Chrome, then I log in to Digsby. I realized I could probably save repeating this daily by writing a small batch script to open up Firefox and Chrome , but I couldn't figure out how to make it work.. and since the whole effort is to save time I don't want to bash my head around in the windows command prompt to do it. I also tired this in powershell but ran in to a bunch of security nonsense.

Is there a way to do this that I am missing? Bonus points if somebody has figured out how to manipulate Digsby via COM , scripting, or python =)

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To make a batch file just list each program file you want to start on a separate line, then put it or a shortcut to it in your Startup folders. Windows also has a START command with more options which can be used for each program -- type help start at a command prompt for usage info. –  martineau Jan 4 '11 at 18:58
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could also try this idea

http://lifehacker.com/5651042/choose-which-applications-launch-on-startup-with-autohotkey

You can compile and AHK Script to an EXE File and link it in your startup folder (if you don't want to keep Autohotkey)

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You can place a shortcut of any application you want to start automatically inside

%systemdrive%\users\%username%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

For example

c:\users\administrator\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

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+1 If you want programs to automatically start up when you login, then add them the startup list - that's what it's designed for. –  Ian Boyd Jan 4 '11 at 16:48
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I'm looking for a single click to open multiple applications. I don't actually log-in every time, I frequently just unlock the screen. –  Bill Jan 4 '11 at 21:39
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7apl is a free multi program launcher that lets you set up groups- you can run anytime not just at start up.

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The script below may help to you. Here it is running a sample program:

As a system engineer or as a developer sometimes you may need to run multiple programs at once as a sequence or, one by one after some intervals. Following is a VB script created for specific purpose.

weAdmin\imAdmin - Specific use for "Run As"
C:\Test\Test1\Test1.exe - Path and file name
admin1234 - Password for the specific user.
100 - Some waiting time to initialize 'run as'
1000 - Waiting time until next program run. (Configure this as you want)
Option explicit
Dim oShell
set oShell= Wscript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")

oShell.Run "RunAs /noprofile /user:weAdmin\imAdmin ""C:\Test\Test1\Test1.exe"""
WScript.Sleep 100
oShell.Sendkeys "admin1234" 
oShell.SendKeys "{ENTER}"
WScript.Sleep 1000

oShell.Run "RunAs /noprofile /user:weAdmin\imAdmin ""C:\Test\Test2\Test2.exe"""
WScript.Sleep 100
oShell.Sendkeys "admin1234"
oShell.SendKeys "{ENTER}"
WScript.Sleep 1000

oShell.Run "RunAs /noprofile /user:weAdmin\imAdmin ""C:\Test\Test3\Test3.exe"""
WScript.Sleep 100
oShell.Sendkeys "admin1234"
oShell.SendKeys "{ENTER}"
WScript.Sleep 1000

oShell.Run "RunAs /noprofile /user:weAdmin\imAdmin ""C:\Test\Test4\Test4.exe"""
WScript.Sleep 100
oShell.Sendkeys "admin1234"
oShell.SendKeys "{ENTER}"
WScript.Sleep 1000

Wscript.Quit
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Welcome to Super User! Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  Bob Jul 9 '12 at 15:06
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Included it for you, please try to include it next time to prevent link rot. –  Tom Wijsman Jul 10 '12 at 0:40
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Found it here: Knowledge Sutra - Start Multiple Programs With One Shortcut - Windows XP

Basically, in your batch file (*.bat), '@echo off' shuts off output on the command prompt, 'rem' lines are comments, 'cd' changes to a directory, 'start' starts up the program without waiting for that program to finish. If you just had 'foo.exe' instead of 'start foo.exe' then the command prompt would stall until you closed the foo program. 'exit' closes the command prompt so you don't get left with an empty black window staring at you.


@echo off
rem SLASH'EM
cd C:\games\slashem-v0.0.7e7f3
start slashem.exe

rem Firefox
cd C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox
start firefox.exe

exit
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