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I'd like to provide a guest OS with multiple CPUs in VirtualBox. My host machine is a quad core HP Compaq and uses the Intel Core 2 vPro hardware.

However, when I try to enable the setting in vbox, I get an error that VT-x is not available. Is this something that I can enable somewhere? how do I find out otherwise whether my hardware supports it?

edit: per suggestions below, I tried using the Securable tool, and it reports that hardware virtualization is "Locked Off". The processors are reported as "Intel Core 2 Quad CPU / Q9400 @ 2.66GHz"

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Make sure your hardware support vt-x check list, then make sure it is enabled in BIOS. –  Joakim Elofsson Aug 14 '09 at 19:04
    
Were you able to find the setting in the BIOS? If not, give us the model name/number of your HP. –  arathorn Aug 14 '09 at 20:36
    
Turns out I just wasn't looking in the right place in the BIOS. It was under the Security menu :-) –  Joel Martinez Aug 14 '09 at 20:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You can use the tool Securable from Gibson Research to find out if your hardware supports virtualization extensions. If it tells you that your hardware is supported, but not enabled, check the BIOS settings to enable it.

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I used securable and updated the question text with what it reported (Locked Off). I poked around in the BIOS but could not see anything about VT-x, hardware virtualization, or vmx –  Joel Martinez Aug 14 '09 at 19:46
    
"Locked Off" means that your processor supports virtualization, but that it has been disabled in the BIOS –  heavyd Aug 14 '09 at 19:56
    
On my Dell Optiplex 960, the only way to get VT enabled is if the other virtualization options (direct IO and trusted execution) were explicitly disabled. –  Nic Apr 3 '13 at 17:01
    
Bitlocker users beware: changing your VT settings may force you to enter your Bitlocker recovery key. If you didn't save your recovery key, turn off Bitlocker before changing settings. –  Nic Apr 3 '13 at 17:01

On My Sony Laptop, the setting is Intel(R) Virtualization Technology, which is under Advanced tab.

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Start your PC, press F2, go to the security option and enable VT technology.

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5  
In some new BIOS, it called Virtual technology or Intel virtualization in the CPU setting option. –  Xu Java Jul 9 '13 at 2:13

As a side note: some laptops require you to shut down and power off the laptop after enabling VT-x in the BIOS, and removing the power cable and battery for 30 seconds. I just today had such a laptop, and found this solution here.

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This may not be obvious. Its sometimes called vanderpool technology in the bios without mentioning virtualisation.

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Your processor does support VT-X, you'll just need to enable it in the BIOS settings. Reboot your computer and press the specified key on the boot screen to go into the BIOS Setup and enable it.

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added specifics about the CPUs on the host. let me know if there's something else I should give you specifics on. thanks! –  Joel Martinez Aug 14 '09 at 19:45
    
Is there any way to enable vt-x without using the BIOS? I just bought a laptop with an Intel 3820QM and the bios does not give me this option; other people complain about it also so it is not something I missed. It is a Clevo P170EM –  Ritsaert Hornstra Jun 5 '12 at 21:09
    
I do have an Ivy Bridge Laptop and it should support VT-x but... The BIOS has no option to enable it; is there another way to enable it? I might create a new SuperUser question. –  Ritsaert Hornstra Jun 23 '12 at 11:42
    
After some searching I found a newer (looks like unofficial) BIOS with the support for VT-x always on (instead of always off). –  Ritsaert Hornstra Jun 24 '12 at 18:07

protected by studiohack May 12 '11 at 6:32

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