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How do I allow limited user to install fonts? I can't give administrator's rights to the staff at my workplace, but they need to be able to install new fonts to do their graphic design work.

OS: Windows XP Pro SP3

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2 Answers 2

It's best to use a font manager anyway, as having loads of fonts installed in the system will slow it down. Also, selecting fonts from a massive list is very difficult.

A font manager will allow the user to activate sets of fonts temporarily and also makes it much easier to select the right font.

I use Extensis Suitcase, since my days of being an architect, but there are lots of free ones available as well.

eg. AMP Font Viewer works fine with XP, but not later.

AMP Font Viewer

Here is an explanation and list of alternative font managers.

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Nice, but doesn't answer the question. – harrymc Jan 16 '11 at 18:14
@harrymc: Yes it does. Using a font manager alows the user to activate and use fonts while being a limited user. – paradroid Jan 16 '11 at 20:51

Give the user "write"+"change" rights to the Fonts folder (%SystemRoot%\Fonts).

cacls "%SystemRoot%\Fonts" /e /g Joe:C
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You got there first. Even if this works, the user might be required to logout and back for this to take effect. – harrymc Jan 16 '11 at 11:28
@harrymc: Filesystem permission changes take effect immediately (unlike user account changes, which require a logout to get the updated token). – grawity Jan 16 '11 at 11:35
This might not just be just a permission change. If required registry keys are constructed during the logon, then logoff may be necessary for a limited account. – harrymc Jan 16 '11 at 11:58
Sorry, I was unclear. I was referring to the installation of a font requiring a logout, not the filesystem changes. – harrymc Jan 16 '11 at 12:05

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