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I'm on a Windows 2003 Server Active Directory domain. My password is due to expire in 14 days (I know this from other means). I had thought that I would get notification of this from AD, when I logged in this morning onto my Windows 7 Ultimate machine, but nothing happened. How does Windows 7 normally notify you of a need to change your password?

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I just tested this, it asks when you log in just as you thought it should. I'm not sure if that is the answer you were looking for or if you wanted to know when it starts warning you..

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You brought up a good point. I was only thinking of how it notifies me of the need to change my password. I hadn't thought of when it would start notifying me of that need. I suppose that when it starts to notify me of the need to change my password is handled in some GPO. Is the way it handles notifying the user also something handled through a GPO? –  Rod Jan 20 '11 at 20:01
    
I believe so @Rod let me take a look at how our GPO is setup and I will let you know. –  Kyle Jan 20 '11 at 20:03
    
Yes @Rod it is managed by GPO the default is 15 days. –  Kyle Jan 20 '11 at 20:11
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It notifies you at the login screen, not as a popup but part of the blue screen. Notifications are handled by the security policy, so if your not seeing them you may need to adjust that on the device or in group policy.

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Even though it's basically the same answer I gave, +1 since your so close to 1000 rep :). –  Kyle Jan 19 '11 at 16:34
    
Woohoo thanks :) –  Jeff F. Jan 19 '11 at 16:35
    
I guess I'm not seeing it. When next I log in, I'll see if there's anything there about needing to change my password, but I don't recall seeing anything there. –  Rod Jan 20 '11 at 19:59
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