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Bitlocker is a harddrive encryption data protection tool which comes with Windows Vista Ultimate and 7. Does anyone know an equivalent for Linux distros like Fedora and Ubuntu?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jan 25 '11 at 18:51

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

TrueCrypt

Main Features:

  • Creates a virtual encrypted disk within a file and mounts it as a real disk.
  • Encrypts an entire partition or storage device such as USB flash drive or hard drive.
  • Encrypts a partition or drive where Windows is installed (pre-boot authentication).
  • Encryption is automatic, real-time (on-the-fly) and transparent.
  • Parallelization and pipelining allow data to be read and written as fast as if the drive was not encrypted.
  • Encryption can be hardware-accelerated on modern processors.
  • Provides plausible deniability, in case an adversary forces you to reveal the password:
  • Hidden volume (steganography) and hidden operating system.
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Is there any module that comes along with the distribution? –  ryan Jan 25 '11 at 18:25
    
@ryan TomMD Noted the specifics about the distros however if you are looking to get TrueCrypt on a given distro there is loads of information with regard to using TrueCrypt on varying distros out there. –  Aaron McIver Jan 25 '11 at 18:29
    
I don't believe this is a correct answer. TrueCrypt usually doesn't come with distributions, such as Ubuntu. What does come with distributions is dm-crypt (also known as cryptsetup or LUKS) –  galets Feb 8 '13 at 0:45
  1. Most Linux distros give you full HD encryption option on installation (via LUKS). If you have installed many major distros yourself in the past few years you should have seen this.
  2. Some distros give you per-user directory encryption options on installation (via ecryptfs). Ubuntu's UNR is an example.
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Thanks for your input. –  ryan Jan 25 '11 at 18:27

Another way is to create an encrypted image that you mount using a local loopback.

This will allow you to 'open' an encrpyted image (which is kept on disk), modify its contents and upon unmounting, will be encrypted. Creates a nice easy way to transport encrypted files (just send the image).

A good ref is located here.

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