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I want to change the MAC address of my laptop. My laptop has Intel Ultimate-N 6300 wireless card.

Although I've managed to change the MAC address in Linux, I still cannot change the MAC address in Windows. I tried adding NetworkAddress registry key, but it didn't work. Even TMAC didn't work(it uses the same mechanism, just to make sure that I did it right). And there is no options to change the mac address in device properties....

Does anyone know if there is an other way to change the MAC address in Windows?

Oh, I use Windows 7

PLEASE DO NOT MARK THIS AS DUPLICATE PLEASE READ! I'M ASKING FOR SOME OTHER WAY THAN EDITING REGISTRY

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marked as duplicate by Joe Taylor, Sathya, studiohack, Nifle, random Jan 29 '11 at 4:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1 Answer

There's no general answer. Some vendors allow it, some vendors don't (but it's still possible), and some implement in a way that it's not changeable.

With Intel cards, it does not seem possible. At least according to Intel, the MAC addresses are hard-wired into the NICs.

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As in the question, I asked this question because I could change the mac address when I'm on linux. So that proves that changing mac is possible. –  user65005 Jan 28 '11 at 0:12
    
You're right, it's probably possible to spoof the address on Win7 too. (It's just not possible to do it permanently with Intel Wireless cards, and the closed-source Windows driver doesn't offer a spoofing option, as opposed to the open-source Intel one. The open-source thing is my interpretation, at least) I can't look into it right now, but I will later. –  Tobias Plutat Jan 28 '11 at 8:32
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