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I usually go to Chrome content settings. I usually go there to enable / disbale js in chrome. Which is too many clicks. Is there a shortcut to enable/disable JavaScript or access content settings.

PS: enabling it back once it is disabled is easy, as a icon is added to the address bar but disabling is the main culprit

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I think your method is the only way to do it, too many clicks or not. –  user3463 Feb 1 '11 at 7:05
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5 Answers

Since Chrome 16, there is an extension named Quick Javascript Switcher that turns Javascript on/off on the fly.

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Do you know of a hotkey which works with this extension? –  watson Jun 30 '13 at 17:52
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If you're using Chrome on Windows then you can create a copy of your Chrome shortcut (rename it to Google Chrome no JS, for example). Right-click on it and select Properties. Add -disable-javascript to the end of the Target field. The end result should look something like this:

C:\Users\UserName\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe -disable-javascript

When you open Chrome using this shortcut then JavaScript is disabled

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

A simple way is to

  1. Open console
  2. Click on setting icon in bottom right
  3. Enable/disable js and several other things
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About every configuration/preferences screen in Chrome is just a web page, so you could just add a link to this URL to your Bookmarks Bar:

chrome://chrome/settings/content
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You could use an extension like NotScripts. From the plugin page:

NotScripts gives you a high degree of "NoScript" like control over what javascript, iframes, and plugins runs in your browser to increase security and lower the CPU usage. It is useful to help mitigate some attacks like certain cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities and drive by downloads by blocking the third-party content before it even runs with it's default deny policy.

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