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I understand that in order to get my wireless modem to work at the wireless N speed, I need all my devices to support wireless N.

I know my modem support wireless N.

And I know I may not notice much difference in speed, but I'd like to see if I can get my computers / devices working at wireless N.

I'm just wondering if theres some sort of tool which will tell me if my devices support wireless N.

I hope I'm not going to be told, that I'll have to check the spec of each device by model number etc.

Perhaps theres a way I can make things easier on myself, perhaps I can block all devices and add each one at a time and determine which devices support wireless N that way. My inital thoughts were I could turn on mac address filtering to check this.

I'm just after to some advice to try and make this process as quick as possible

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If you have windows 7 you can go into the device manager and right click your wifi adapter under Network adapters and select properties. Under the advanced tab there should be option called 802.11n mode, if you adapter has that option then it supports wireless N.

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I have windows XP and a Dell Wireless 1390 WLAN Mini-Card and it has 802.1h+d. I guess this means I don't have wireless N capability on my laptop ? Question, is it possible that another laptop could use wireless N and another wireless G ? I mean does my wap give you two signals ? –  Jules Jun 24 '11 at 16:11
    
@jules Well N is operated on the 5ghz frequency and g/b/a are on the 2.4 ghz so it means the access point needs 2 antenna (one may be internal). I would say yes. While there may be N access points that don't serve G/b/a as well I have NEVER seen a consumer AP rated for wireless N that doesn't have the ability to do both by default. Meaning if you want only N you have to configure it as such by, default most if not all wireless N routers allow B/G/and N. . –  Kyle Jun 24 '11 at 17:20
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If you have windows 7 you can go into the device manager and right click your wifi adapter under Network adapters and select properties. Under the advanced tab there should be option called 802.11n mode, if you adapter has that option then it supports wireless N.

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