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How can I find out the true resolution of a movie when I doubt what's stated in the properties of the file is accurate?

I have a movie AVI which is in 1280x960 which I recorded with a device. I believe the device cannot film at all in 1280x960 and that it's really shooting in 640x480 and it has been tricked to enlarge the movie by 2x, so it appears like 1280x960.

The picture seems enlarged at 1280 resolution, and if I minimize it at 640x480, it seeems normal. If I choose properties it will say 1280x960, because it's made to say that.

Is there some kind of program that analyzes the movie and gives me the appropriate and actual resolution from the pixels? Not a program that says what's in the movie properties like DPMEdiainfo (because that's possibly faked).

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Might find this of interest, wmpoweruser.com/htc-mozart-video-quality-vs-resolution-test. – therube May 20 '11 at 3:55

Try this software MediaInfo

Once installed right click on any media file and select Media Info

In options you can change the default View setting, I like Tree View.

enter image description here

.

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Thanks for answering. I have tried the software you mention above, but it doesn't analyze the film. It just tells me the resolution the film has in properties. I need a program that doesn't read what stands in the properties, but analyzes the movie itself. – Adrian C Feb 23 '11 at 15:33
    
Here is one to try...avicodec.duby.info – Moab Feb 23 '11 at 17:21
    
heh. This is a REALLY old question, so standards have changed so... you might want to edit the answer to show how to use the software rather than just having a link. – Journeyman Geek Oct 9 '15 at 1:45

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