Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to use the following scenario for my favorite applications under Linux (Ubuntu 10.10) in order to save grabbing the mouse and clicking them:

  1. Open a terminal (Ctrl-Alt-D)
  2. Type my alias for the application (eg: ff for firefox)
  3. Have the application start and the terminal killed immediately, not when I close the application.
  4. Define the dimensions and position of the application using the --geometry parameter from gnome-terminal

For now, I have created the following alias, but it does not behave as described:

alias ff="gnome-terminal --geometry 100x100-0+0 -e 'firefox'; exit"

Instead, it opens a new terminal, kills the first one, and kills the second one upon exiting firefox.

If I try the following instead:

alias ff2="firefox &; exit"

I get the error message:

bash: syntax error near unexpected token `;'

In fact, all these attempts fail:

alias ff="gnome-terminal --geometry 100x100-0+0 -e 'firefox'; exit"
alias ff2="firefox &; exit"
alias ff3="nohup firefox & ; exit"
alias ff4="nohup firefox; exit

How can I obtain the desired behavior?

share|improve this question

migrated from stackoverflow.com Feb 26 '11 at 17:31

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

2  
Are you aware of the & operator and the nohup command? Have you looked at them yet? –  S.Lott Feb 24 '11 at 20:18
    
Hi S.Lott. Yes, I know about it. But I did not succeed in obtaining the desired behavior (specifically, killing the terminal) using the '&' operator either. Could it be done that way? –  Morlock Feb 24 '11 at 20:22

3 Answers 3

Actually, this is it:

nohup firefox & 2> /dev/null; exit;

If you want to use an alias, simply do:

alias ff='nohup firefox & 2> /dev/null; exit;'

and watch the magic happen when you execute ff

share|improve this answer
2  
The combination with the redirection of the output/error channels is key here. +1 –  0xC0000022L Feb 24 '11 at 20:55
    
Yes, I would never have thought to use the redirection in that case... Thanks karl! –  Morlock Feb 24 '11 at 20:59

It's a SuperUser answer, but are you aware of the Alt-F2 shortcut?

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure an alias can't execute multiple commands? Try my answer. –  karlphillip Feb 24 '11 at 20:59
    
Thanks Tobu, I learn something valuable. –  Morlock Feb 24 '11 at 21:00
    
Whoops, I should have been quicker to fact-check. –  Tobu Feb 24 '11 at 21:00

nohup command arguments & ; exit

Perhaps you might find it more productive to define keyboard shortcuts in your window manager to simply open the various programs of interest?

share|improve this answer
    
alias ff3="nohup firefox & ; exit" gives me the same error as for my ff2 attempt. Removing the & does not work either... sorry. –  Morlock Feb 24 '11 at 20:44
1  
My answer is not a usage of the alias command, which is what introduces that problem. –  Chris Stratton Feb 24 '11 at 20:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.