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I used to type

y QUERY

in the Firefox address bar and get http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%s&aq=f (http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=QUERY&aq=f in this particular case).

How can I do that in Chrome?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Visit YouTube so Chrome will automatically pick up its OpenSearch provider information, then right-click on the address bar and choose Edit search engines...

On Chrome 10 (the current beta version) and later: click in the middle box immediately to the right of YouTube Video Search, replace the youtube.com with y, and close the preferences tab.

On Chrome 9 (the current stable version) and earlier: click on YouTube Video Search, choose Edit, replace the youtube.com in the Keyword box with y, and click Close.

Now you can search YouTube by just typing y query into the Omnibox (address bar). Notice that after you type y and a space, the left side of the address bar changes to indicate that you are about to search YouTube.

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  • Click on the "wrench" and open Options
  • On the Basics tab, click the Manage button in the Search section
  • Click Add
  • Fill the Name (Youtube), Keyword (y) and URL (http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%s&aq=f)

You should be able to use it now by typing

y SOMETHING

to Chrome's URL bar

enter image description here

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Chrome doesn't sync custom searches (yet) and XMarks doesn't convert them between browsers, so I created a service called Shortmarks that lets you use custom searches from any browser by setting Shortmarks as the default search engine. I've been using it for almost a year now and am of course biased, but I love it.

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