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in most GUI text editor I can use ctrl click to open multiple files at once. I can't do that in gvim.
What the gvim way to do it?
Tnx.

-edit- ...using gui way instead of command line.

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tnx 4 the answers but none are solutions that I really wanted. Btw, I use ubuntu linux. –  mhd Mar 21 '11 at 4:49
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5 Answers 5

Easy:

gvim -p file1.c file3.c ...

or:

gvim -p *.c
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gVim opens multiple files in buffers.

:tab ball

will open these buffers in their own tabs. I guess you could add this command to your _vimrc to make it happen each time gvim runs.


In Windows: gvimext.dll: Support loading files into a VIM tab

  1. Select multiple files (with CTRL-Click)
  2. Right-Click to get context menu
  3. Click "Edit with single Vim using tabs"
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The extension DLL seems to be out of date. –  atoumey Apr 11 '12 at 16:24
    
@atourney: The extension DLL works fine for me. I'm using gVim 7.3.46 with Windows 7 64. –  Leftium Apr 12 '12 at 0:58
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This is a partial registry fix (selecting multiple files and right-clicking Edit with gVim opens those files in different tabs in the same window)

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\gvim.exe\shell\edit\command]  
@="C:\\Program Files\\Vim\\vim70\\gvim.exe --remote-tab-silent \"%1\""
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You can open multiple files in gvim. After you've selected the files you want to open, right-click and select "Edit with single Vim". Vim will initially display only the first file, but all the file names are in Vim's argument list. Execute

:n

to open each file in the list one at a time (:N to go back), or

:all

to see all the files at once, each in a different Vim window, or

:tab all

to see each in a different tab.

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  • Open files:

    vim {file1,file2,...}
    

    in buffers, then use

    :ls (list), :n (next), :p (previous), :b<N> (open file N), :b [press TAB]
    
  • Open in tabs:

    vim -p <files> 
    

    as polemon wrote, then use same commands as above

  • Open in multiple windows :

    vim -o {file1,file2,...}
    

    Then see e.g. http://www.cs.oberlin.edu/~kuperman/help/vim/windows.html

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