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I need to leave my desk top at work (windows 7) up and running all the time. After I leave work in the evening and come back the next morning, it appears to be turned off. I have to push the start button and login to the computer.

In Windows 7, where are the settings to leave the computer on 24x7? So I could just lock the machine when I go home and log back in the next day with out having to turn it on.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Control Panel > Hardware and Sound > Power Options. On the left side click on Change when the computer sleeps, then change the dropdown for Put the computer to sleep: to Never.

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It's very easy to set that up. My computer is running all the time without any problems. Here's how to do it. First, go to control panel and to power options there. Select high performance option and then click on change plan settings on the right. There, you'll have option to set the time after which the computer goes into sleep and time after which monitor turns off. Just set sleep to never and that should be it.

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I have the same necessity at work and I ended up using Don't Sleep. Whenever I need to keep the PC awake, I open it and send it to tray. It's freeware and suitable for Windows-7 x64/x86.

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It's possible your IT department has some energy saving software in operation to power down machines over night in order to save on electricity bills.

That's what we do, we can add machines to be exempt but we'd need a really good reason for doing so.

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Very good point. This could be controlled through Group Policy and the method I listed above could be set to not even display. –  LeoB Mar 23 '11 at 16:52

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