Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Similar to how HP or ACER will create a partition on the hard drive which you can boot from using F10 or something similar if your computer crashes. What do I have to do to my windows 7 installation CD to make this partition act exactly as the CD does. I want there to be some way so that when I click F10, the recovery partition will start up and act as if I just put in the Windows 7 installation CD, but if I don't activate the partition, it will act as if it is not there. Do I need to download some sort of software to accomplish this, or would it be at all possible to just copy the files directly from the CD to the D:\ drive?

share|improve this question
    
See this...suite101.com/content/… –  Moab Mar 27 '11 at 16:14
    
Also this one...forums.mydigitallife.info/threads/… –  Moab Mar 27 '11 at 16:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use Rollback RX it is similar but much better than the HP, Acer restore systems in many ways.

share|improve this answer

If you copy the files to the partition and set it as bootable, it should work. I think an even better solution: make the partition, then take the 30 minutes to install windows 7 from the CD to that partition. Then if you're forced to recover, you can skip that chore and go straight to windows.

As for setting the partition to an F key, I think that's written into the bios and cannot be changed/added/removed.

I did see this longwinded post that implies you can restore a norton ghost image using a built in key like F10. But it's old, not sure if this would still work. An image is ideal, you can restore without reinstalling anything.

http://www.911cd.net/forums//index.php?showtopic=12447&mode=linear

share|improve this answer
    
"As for setting the partition to an F key, I think that's written into the bios and cannot be changed/added/removed.".... Its part of the master boot record, not the bios in most cases, UEFI bios does play a part if it is configured to, mostly relies on the MBR. –  Moab Mar 27 '11 at 16:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.