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I have a license for VMWare Workstation, and have recently switched my main computer to a Mac.

VMWare Workstation says it can be installed on Windows and Linux. Is there any way to install it on a Mac?

(I tried googling, but all the results get polluted with installing Mac as a Guest OS in Workstation).

I know there is VMWare Fusion, which is MAc exclusive, but a) It would require buying another licence, and b) It seems overly focussed on supporting Windows VM's, and doesn't seem to have the wide range of Guest OS support that Workstation does (not to mention the usefulness of the Snapshot feature).

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It's not possible to install it on Mac OS X. You can install Windows on the Mac though, but that kind of defeats the purpose.

VMware Fusion has similar (or the same) guest OS support, including the Linuxes. I personally haven't needed more than Windows and those, so can't speak much about the rest. It is based on the same technology though, so should be very similar.

VMware Fusion also supports snapshots (but possibly not quite as powerful as Workstation). It's also much cheaper.

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A shame. I had hoped that through some command hackery, it might have been possible to get the Linux version to build and run. I was planning to use BootCamp to put Windows on it anyway. I just need access to my Ubuntu VM's and be able to manage them. i guess that stuff will have to be done in Windows still. Ah well. –  Samuel Walker Apr 2 '11 at 17:32
    
@Samuel Virtualization software uses kernel extensions. No matter how compatible and easily portable regular user software might be, this is a whole different beast. You can access your existing VMs in Fusion, but there might be a few function you don't have access to there (e.g. virtual network configuration). Also, remember that the host system is different, and Windows licensing doesn't like that at all. –  Daniel Beck Apr 2 '11 at 18:07
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