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when I got following some information using fdisk -l,

there were some invalid information about system name.

I installed file system reiserfs, xfs on sdb6, sdb7.

but the system didn't recognizes disk's file system name.

it is not FAT12 system.

how do I correct this name?

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
   /dev/sda1   *           1       10199    81923436    7  HPFS/NTFS
   /dev/sda2           10200       19457    74364885    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
   /dev/sda5           10200       19457    74364853+   7  HPFS/NTFS

   Disk /dev/sdb: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
   255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
   Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
   Disk identifier: 0xf16cf16c

     Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
   /dev/sdb1   *           1       10199    81923436    7  HPFS/NTFS
   /dev/sdb2           10200       19457    74364885    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
   /dev/sdb5           10200       19075    71296438+   7  HPFS/NTFS
   /dev/sdb6           19076       19267     1542208+   1  FAT12
   /dev/sdb7           19268       19457     1526143+   1  FAT12
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 10 '11 at 12:03

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's not the partition name, but its type (or more precisely, the type of file system on the partition). In fdisk, you can change it with the t command. For reiserfs and xfs, the correct type is 83 (Native Linux). However, Linux ignores these types, and they are mostly a historical artifact.

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thanks, i changed with t but it didn't change.. remains FAT12 yet.. – KayKay Apr 11 '11 at 14:39
1  
@KayKay you have to write the table back to disk with the w command before the change takes effect. – phihag Apr 11 '11 at 16:40

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