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I have MacOS snow leopard and Windows 7 installed on same hard drive(on a iMac). I want to have a folder that is shared between them where I can write data, not only read. Is this possible? On windows partition MacOS says that I don't have permission to write and on Mac partition Windows says same thing.

Thanks!

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 24 '11 at 2:45

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you create a Fat32 partition from either mac or windows you should be able to both read and write to it from either OS.

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Ok, I will try. The problem is with write access not with partition type because Windows can read from Mac partition and Mac can read from Windows partition. – Felics Feb 27 '11 at 12:28
    
@Felics: the lack of write access is due to the partition type (or more accurately, the limited support for those partition types under the other OS). – Gordon Davisson Feb 27 '11 at 18:32

You could create an ext3 partition. With the proper drivers, both MacOS and Windows can read and write to files in a ext3 partition. ("Use a Linux file system for Mac/PC drive sharing")

You might also look at the other options listed at Lifehacker: "A Comprehensive Guide to Sharing Your Data Across Multi-Booting Windows, Mac, and Linux PCs".

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My answer is simply to format a flash drive to FAT 32 put it into a spare USB Port ( I recommend a 3.0 USB flash drive and 3.0 USB port )You can add to and remove from both drives. I then sync my devices from my Mac boot drive using iTunes.

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Why use a flash drive when you have your hard drive inside the computer that both operating systems can access? This is a bad solution and should not be used in this scenario. – Piccolo Aug 26 '14 at 22:38

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