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I'm trying to change a file within a game I have installed on my computer, but the read only attribute won't change. I've researched this and found a way using the Command Prompt where I can change the attributes of the files; specifically the read only attribute.

The command I was given is:

attrib -s-r C:\<folder path>/d/s

Thus I opened a Command Prompt and typed in:

attrib-r-s<C:/The Creative Assembly>/d/s

Each time the result is: "The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect."

I've tried copying and pasting the file path, or typing it manually, but it still won't work. I can't seem to work out what's wrong. Any ideas?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 24 '11 at 22:23

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You're trying to modify ONE file only? Why not use windows explorer, right-click on file, properties, un-check Read-only checkbox, click OK. –  Vik David Apr 24 '11 at 20:12
    
every time i un-check the read-only checkbox and apply it just checks it again, that was my original problem. Done some research and this is the solution i found that seemed like it should work, but it just doesn't want to. –  Ryan Connolly Apr 24 '11 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

Make sure you are:

  • including spaces in the command as outlined below
  • not using < > in the pathname (< > is usually a convention meaning you have to substitute something for <whatever is included>)
  • are under an admin account or running cmd.exe as administrator
  • using blackslashes \ not forward slashes / in the pathname

attrib -r -s C:\The Creative Assembly /d /s

If that fails, try:

attrib -r -h -s "C:\The Creative Assembly" /d /s

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1  
Creative and Assembly are not valid arguments. ;) Since the path has spaces in it, you need to escape them individually or wrap the whole path with double quotes. –  iglvzx May 19 '12 at 22:55

First, get the exact path where you want to apply this to. You don't want to do it on C:\ and screw up everything.

The command should be something like this:

attrib -s -r C:\path\to\your\game /d /s

Where:

  • /d - processes folders
  • /s - processes files in all directories
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so even just the next file in? attrib -s -r C:\The Creative Assembly\Rome - Total War /d /s does it need proper spacing and what about the < > round the file path? is that needed? First time of me using this.. –  Ryan Connolly Apr 24 '11 at 20:07
    
You don't need <> and use "C:\path\to\your game" if it has space in it –  manojlds Apr 24 '11 at 20:10
    
i'm doing everything the way its meant to be, its working properly and i'm copy and pasting the file path to make sure i don't make a mistake and its telling me that "the system connot find the file specified" –  Ryan Connolly Apr 24 '11 at 20:15
1  
Can you paste here the exact command you are entering now? –  8088 Apr 25 '11 at 4:30

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