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The columns in xp's task manager differ from the ones in vista/7 and that's why I'm asking that question.Which column in vista's task manager shows the amount of memory that a program had allocated?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Memory column under the processes tab... Same as XP if I understand your question correctly.

Edit: Misunderstood your question. Here's a rundown of what each memory column does from Windows Help.

  • Memory - Working Set - Amount of memory in the private working set plus the amount of memory the process is using that can be shared by other processes.
  • Memory - Peak Working Set - Maximum amount of working set memory used by the process.
  • Memory - Working Set Delta - Amount of change in working set memory used by the process.
  • Memory - Private Working Set - Subset of working set that specifically describes the amount of memory a process is using that cannot be shared by other processes.
  • Memory - Commit Size - Amount of virtual memory that is reserved for use by a process.
  • Memory - Paged Pool - Amount of committed virtual memory for a process that can be written to another storage medium, such as the hard disk.
  • Memory - Non-paged Pool - Amount of committed virtual memory for a process that cannot be written to another storage medium.

Probably Commit Size you're looking for?

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The column I needed while using XP is not the default one,which you described.It's named 'virtual memory size'.But in vista the columns have totally different names. –  John Aug 22 '09 at 19:26
    
@John, it's under View -> Select Columns –  hyperslug Aug 22 '09 at 19:29
    
You misunderstood me.I know where the columns are located at,but I don't know the name of that particular column "VM Size" in Vista's task manager. –  John Aug 22 '09 at 19:31
    
Yes,thanks for the edit,I found it at support.microsoft - unbelievable. –  John Aug 22 '09 at 19:55
    
I doubt he's looking for commit size. That measures virtual memory (address space) usage, and virtual memory is not really a scarce resource. –  David Schwartz Aug 30 '11 at 17:16
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