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I might be building a computer for one of my friends soon and I decided to get an i5-2500K for slight overclocking and he's scared of voiding the warranty so I'm wondering: Is the warranty void after I overclock it?

Remember, K series has unlocked multiplier so I don't know if the OC policy for CPUs with unlocked multiplier is going to be different from other CPUs

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closed as too localized by random Aug 12 '11 at 11:59

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I don't know for certain, but I'm fairly sure overclocking does void your warranty. Processors hardly ever fail though, and even if it does as long as you didn't fry it overvolting they'll never know the difference. –  Shinrai May 4 '11 at 21:51
    
The only safe answer we can give is „it depends”. In some areas, the warranty will be void only if the damage is caused by overclocking while in some other areas the act of overclocking itself may be enough to void the warranty. If you're uncertian, the best way to be sure is to read the warranty card and your local laws regulating warranty. –  AndrejaKo May 4 '11 at 22:36
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You can now buy a Performance Tuning Protection Plan for current gen CPUs from Intel ($35 or less), and, as long as you stay inside the normal voltage range / don't damage it externally (i.e. using that silver CPU glue that physically bonds the heatsink to the processor), etc. They'll replace it if you bork it up via overclocking. (Be sure to read the fine print, etc. of course!) –  BrainSlugs83 Nov 1 at 21:33
    
@Shinrai I'd be surprised it there wasn't a NAND bit or configuration fuse in the processor that it didn't "set" upon being overclocked from the marked stock frequency (specifically for warranty purposes). It would be a simple thing to engineer... –  BrainSlugs83 Nov 1 at 21:37
    
@BrainSlugs83 - At least for consumer Intel chips, I can say with a good bit of surety that there isn't any such thing. –  Shinrai Nov 2 at 7:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I find it bizzare that Intel would sell and unlocked CPU and have overclocking violate the warranty, but it does appear to void the warranty. See footnote 1: http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/reseller/apac/eng/449714.htm

In any event, no one can tell if you've been overclocking. So...don't ask don't tell.

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You can now buy a Performance Tuning Protection Plan for current gen CPUs from Intel ($35 or less), and, as long as you stay inside the normal voltage range / don't damage it externally (i.e. using that silver CPU glue that physically bonds the heatsink to the processor), etc. They'll replace it if you bork it up via overclocking. (Be sure to read the fine print, etc. of course!) –  BrainSlugs83 Nov 1 at 21:33

Most, if not all CPUs will have their warranty voided if you overclock them. But you shouldn't really be scared. An overclock (if done properly) can be left on a CPU for years!

I have had my AMD Phenom II CPU overclocked to the max using a high voltage and it's still running great after two years.

By the time the CPU is dead it will probably be time for an upgrade anyway.

Don't forget to use an aftermarket heatsink; the stock cooler doesn't do an overclocked CPU any justice.

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Should or shouldn't? –  AndrejaKo May 4 '11 at 22:54
    
Slight overclock meaning no aftermarket coolers and go from 3.30 GHz to about 3.4 or 3.5 not something extreme like 4.5 or 5 GHz –  Alex Yan May 4 '11 at 23:06

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