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Not for illegal use! I have some home movies and footage from a wedding, and I'd like to easily 'rip' or extract the audio to WAV/MP3/etc.

If the audio came off as one big file, I am proficient enough to splice/slice it up myself into individual tracks, but can't seem to find any software that makes the task of getting audio from a DVD very simple.

As I said, these are not encrypted/commercial DVDs.

Any suggestions? Does not have to be free, but must be worth the money.

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Mac or PC ? –  Michael Pryor Jul 15 '09 at 16:54
    
PC, in this case, but thanks for any suggestions. –  anonymous coward Jul 16 '09 at 18:16
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8 Answers 8

mplayer can do it either with -dumpaudio (to get the raw stream, either usually either PCM or AC3 on DVD) or -ao pcm (to get a PCM stream). Also, mencoder could do it, with -of rawaudio and any -ao setting (use -vo copy)

example (untested, no DVD in front of me):

mencoder -o /tmp/foo.mp3 -of rawaudio -oac mp3lame -lameopts preset=standard -ovc copy dvd://1

The dvd://1 means DVD title 1. You can use mplayer dvd://1 to see what title one is, and to see which is the correct title. If its not 1, try 2, etc.

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I'm pretty sure you can do this with Adobe Premiere.

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To be fair, you can do just about ANYTHING with premiere. That's why it costs a jillion dollars. (As a side note, I love the thing and use it all the time, I just feel about about recommending $500+ software.) –  Electrons_Ahoy Jul 15 '09 at 17:56
    
Yea its very expensive, I probably wouldn't have it if I hadn't gotten it bundled with my dell laptop –  kpoehls Jul 15 '09 at 17:57
    
That's definitely a correct answer, but kind of over-kill for the specific task. Say, is the trial version a fully-functional trial, or limited-save, etc? –  anonymous coward Jul 16 '09 at 18:18
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Much depends on what platform you're on. However you can get Handbrake for most platforms to rip the content from the DVD and then use ffmpeg (or a GUI front end for ffmpeg) to extract just the audio.

There an entry in the Handbrake FAQ which addresses this, but doesn't tell you much more than I wrote above.

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VLC-Player

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PGCDemux will directly de-multiplex the audio streams from un-encrypted video files, from which you can process them further

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ImTOO DVD Audio Ripper has good support for a range of output formats, will take advantage of multi-core CPUs, and it looks like it will handle the file splitting for you as well. It should make the task pretty simple!

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Audacity (free and open source) is pretty useful. It records from your sound card, so you just need to play your DVD on your computer then hit record in Audacity.

Works fine on Windows but I couldn't get it to record on Ubuntu because of Ubuntu's weird audio set up. However, I can easily rip the audio using mplayer (see other answer above) and open the file in Audacity for editing.

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If it's a data DVD with some video files stored on it, you can simply

ffmpeg -i /path/to/input.file -map 0:a output.wav

If it's a video DVD (with a VIDEO_TS directory etc) you can use vobcopy and ffmpeg:

vobcopy -l -o - | ffmpeg -i - -map 0:a output.wav

Or alternatively (only works for unencrypted DVDs),

cd /path/to/VIDEO_TS

# Find the VTS_XX_N.VOB that corresponds to what you want to rip
# Normally this is the one with the most files, often VTS_01_{1..6}.VOB

ffmpeg -i "concat:VTS_01_1.VOB|VTS_01_2.VOB|VTS_01_3.VOB|VTS_01_4.VOB" \
-map 0:a output.wav
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