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I'm running Centos 5 and I need to know what version of PHP I'm running, is there a command for this which I can run?

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up vote 117 down vote accepted

try running any of the following at the command line

php -i

to get alot of info or

php -v

to just get the version information

It should give you all information you need about the php install.

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11  
+1 php -v was a lot faster – hyperslug Aug 24 '09 at 9:10
4  
Thx, this worked :-) php -i | grep 'PHP Version' gave me the answer – Roland Aug 24 '09 at 9:12
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Just be cautious that the CLI version of PHP (checked from command line) can be different from the one served by your webserver (shown by phpinfo()) – Akshay Raje Jun 4 '14 at 11:14
    
@AkshayRaje Exactly. Most people who ask “What PHP version am I using?” are usually referring to the Apache/Nginx PHP module and not the PHP CLI stuff. The PHP CLI info has 100% nothing to do with the PHP module used by Apache/Nginx. – JakeGould Feb 23 at 12:06

You can make an index.php file with

<?php phpinfo() ?>
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7  
this has the advantage of working on servers you don't have ssh access to, though personally I've always preferred <?php ?>, just for the futureproofing :P – Phoshi Aug 24 '09 at 10:56
    
Ah, right, I have a habit of using ASP tags. – hyperslug Aug 24 '09 at 21:26
2  
On any PHP website one can often see the version in the X-Powered-By header in each PHP generated HTTP response. When you don't have SSH access, then sometimes phpshell.sourceforge.net can be used. (Though with much care, like one needs to check if a folder is writable before running a tar command.) – Arjan Sep 14 '09 at 16:21
    
First, this is the answer. Most people who ask “What PHP version am I using?” are usually referring to the Apache/Nginx PHP module and not the PHP CLI stuff. The PHP CLI info has 100% nothing to do with the PHP module used by Apache/Nginx. But @Arjan also, many systems administrators disable the “X-Powered-By” header servers send out as part of security hardening. While it seems convenient for developers, headers like that put you on the “sucker list” for botnet attacks. If you run a server and the main way you are determining PHP version is via “X-Powered-By” your process is very flawed. – JakeGould Feb 23 at 12:06

An answer was accepted, but another option on RPM systems (RHEL, Centos, Fedora, etc.) is to use the following:

rpm -q php

And while I'm at it, the general method for using RPM to find info on a package for any rpm-installed program or file is similar to this (for awk):

  1. Find the full path to the file if not known, such as for an executable in $PATH:

    type -path awk

  2. Find the name, including version, of the package containing the file:

    rpm -qf /usr/bin/awk

  3. If desired, query for info from that package:

    rpm -qi gawk

It's a bit trickier for packages installed and used by Apache since they may not be on $PATH, but you can start with something like:

rpm -qa | egrep -i 'php|awk'

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Use

more /etc/php.ini

This will show you:

  1. Apache Version
  2. PHP Versions
  3. PHP Functions
  4. Various options regarding PHP
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