Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My workplace allows for remote logins to the company network, with certain prerequisites for securing a computer before making the connection, one of which is that Windows must be used to make the connection, and that Bitlocker must be used to secure the physical hard drive on which Windows is installed.

I am not being asked to set up my home computer for this, but I thought it might be a good idea. I am planning to purchase a new computer which comes with Windows 7 pre-installed, to install Ubuntu Linux on a separate hard drive, and then to set that hard drive as the first to boot. That way GRUB2 will allow booting into either operating system, and each operating system is independent of the other, each ignoring the other's hard drive. This is how my current computer is set up.

My question is whether I can encrypt the Windows 7 hard drive with Bitlocker in such a setup, without interfering with Linux or with GRUB2, and if I can, how best to go about it.

share|improve this question
    
Just encrypt the disk with Windows 7 on it. –  fpmurphy1 May 22 '11 at 15:48
    
You should be able to do that, but I'm not sure of the specifics. My preference nowadays is to use virtual machines if I need to run linux (with Windows as the host). –  Spectre May 22 '11 at 16:01
    
@fpmurphy, that seems like what should be the case. Have you tried that in practice? @Spectre, in my case at least, this is optional, and I do most of my work in Linux anyway, so I'd rather skip Bitlocker so that I could run Ubuntu on the bare metal, if it came to that. –  bgvaughan May 22 '11 at 16:44
    
You might check with your IT folks if a different disk encryption system would be acceptable, because I know you can do this fairly easily with TrueCrypt. Whether or not IT will be receptive to allowing that difference depends strongly on how large your company is, though. –  jcrawfordor May 22 '11 at 18:50
    
Bitlocker is definitely a requirement for their preferred system of remote access. There's a different system for remote access, but it's fussier and more limited, so I wanted to check on the issue with Bitlocker before I considered the alternative. –  bgvaughan May 22 '11 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the new computer does not have a Trusted Platform Module, it should work just fine without any special setup procedures. Get the new computer, get Linux installed and dual boot working, then enable Bitlocker and encrypt the Windows drive.

I've got a similar configuration that works just fine, but I have separate partitions for Windows and Linux on the same drive.

It's still doable with a TPM, but it's not as straightforward.

share|improve this answer

Bitlocker doesn't support dual-boot systems, and although some people claim they have workarounds "They Are Not Guaranteed.

So, if you need to create a dual boot system, you will need to turn bitlocker off!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.