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I have a dsl router which is connected to the inet and a wireless modem (Belkin 54g). I am trying to connect these to use wireless lan. The ip of my dsl router is http://192.168.1.1/, the adress of my wlan modem is 192.168.2.1 Unfortunately there are too many options I dont really understand so I hope you can you help me to configure it. If you need any current settings feel free to ask. Thx for advise!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I recommend to put your WLAN access point (is it really an access-point or rather a WLAN router?) into the same subnet as your router network (192.168.1.0/24). Most routers with built-in DHCP server serve only a range which stats at 192.168.1.30 and ends somewhat around 192.168.1.100. So you're free to chose any IP address which is outside this range in order to configure fixed-IP devices.

If in doubt just log in on the web interface of your router and check the DHCP range.

Let's assume IP 192.168.1.10 is free. Then log in on the web interface of your Access Point and set it's IP to 192.168.1.10, subnet mask 255.255.255.0.

In case your Wireless AP is actually a router (usually such devices have a 4 + 1 port Ethernet connection; 4 ports LAN + 1 port WAN). Then make sure you disable the DHCP server on your Wireless AP and hook it up to your router using a LAN port (not the WAN port). I recommend this in order to prevent a nested NAT-network with two DHCP servers which is usually easier to manage.

The setup should look a bit like:

---<DSL>--- [DSL router ] ------ [Wireless AP ]  - - - - WLAN clients (192.168.1.0/24)
            [192.168.1.1]        [192.168.1.10]
                 |
                 |- [LAN client] (192.168.1.0/24)
                 \- [LAN client] (192.168.1.0/24)
  • DSL router configuration

    • IP: 192.168.1.1
    • Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    • DHCP server: Enabled
  • Wireless AP:

    • IP: 192.168.1.10
    • Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    • DHCP server: Disabled
    • Connected to the DSL router using one of the LAN ports (do not use the WAN port, if it has one)

This way all your clients (including WLAN clients) will get IP addresses from the DHCP server built-in into the DSL router and you operate only one logical network.

An alternative solution is of course to keep the routing functionality of your WLAN device (if it's a WLAN router and not a pure AP):

---<DSL>--- [DSL router ] ------ [WLAN Router]  - - - - WLAN clients (192.168.2.0/24)
            [192.168.1.1]        [192.168.2.1]
                 |
                 |- [LAN client] (192.168.1.0/24)
                 \- [LAN client] (192.168.1.0/24)

In this case you would hook up the Wireless AP via the WAN port which gets an IP from the DSL router then (in range 192.168.1.1). Then all clients connecting to the AP will get a DHCP address from the Wireless AP in the range 192.168.2.0/24.

The setup would look as follows:

  • DSL router configuration

    • IP: 192.168.1.1
    • Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    • DHCP server: Enabled
  • Wireless AP:

    • IP: 192.168.2.1
    • Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    • DHCP server: Enabled
    • Connected to the DSL router using one of the WAN port

The drawback is that you have to operate two DHCP servers and the Wireless AP performs NAT routing towards the DSL-router network. So accessing the Internet is done via nested NAT network. A WLAN client on IP 192.168.1.50 would be NATed to 192.168.1.x and again NATed to the public IP.

Moreover this setup makes it difficult to access services on the WLAN clients from the LAN clients attached to the DSL router as there is no way (except configuring static NAT rules) to access the WLAN clients from 192.168.1.0/24 network.

Of course if your Wireless AP comes with a 4-port switch you might think about just connecting all LAN clients to the Wireless AP too:

---<DSL>--- [DSL router ] ------ [WLAN Router]  - - - - WLAN clients (192.168.2.0/24)
            [192.168.1.1]        [192.168.2.1]
                                       |
                                       |- [LAN client] (192.168.2.0/24)
                                       \- [LAN client] (192.168.2.0/24)

This way the LAN clients will be able to communicate to WLAN clients. But it depends on your location whether this setup is feasible or not.

So either you go for the first proposal (just using your Wireless router as a pure access point with no DHCP functionality) or you split up the network - but then I recommend to go for the latest diagram not connecting any devices to the DSL router.

Specificially this is important for Windows 7 Home Group sharing. If you intent do use home groups and want to share data between LAN clients and WLAN clients, then these clients need to be within the same LAN segment with direct communication paths. This is only feasible if you connect either all devices to the WLAN router (last diagram) or just put the complete network into the same LAN segment (first proposal with disabled DHCP client on WLAN device).

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2  
I don't have the time to read what you wrote, but I thought it deserved an upvote. –  paradroid May 28 '11 at 12:09
    
:) I have never received such a comment yet but I am still quite a newbie here. Although I start to like the stackexchange community. –  SkyBeam May 28 '11 at 12:18
    
Then please continue to write such answers :) –  slhck May 28 '11 at 13:50
1  
@slhck Oh what a honor to get a reply from a user with such high reputation :) –  SkyBeam May 28 '11 at 13:55

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