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I have some sharewares that are time bound. When I used to run these on XP, probably due to registry access thing, the time never incremented. I mean, a 15 day trial app would be stuck at "1 day finished and 14 remaining" for years! Needless to say I was pretty ecstatic to see this as those and similar apps would promptly expire in previous Windows, and it was completely serendipitous.

However, now that I have Windows 7 as my OS, these apps do actually expire! Has something changed in version 7? Why do 7 and XP behave this way? Could someone explain me this please?

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closed as not a real question by Shiki, Wuffers, Hello71, Sathya May 29 '11 at 17:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I removed the part about how to circumvent the restriction... –  slhck May 29 '11 at 11:11
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I knew it was kinda unethcal to put it there but still went on to. You did the right thing, no problem. –  Peter May 29 '11 at 11:13

1 Answer 1

How applications deal with license expiry is entirely down to the application.

There are a million and one ways of doing it, and you can bet that every application does it differently.

Thus, the question cannot be answered.

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But still, the real question is the difference between the 2 OS's registry. –  Shiki May 29 '11 at 16:57
    
I would imagine that it was some quirk with the old OS X installation and not some underlying difference. There is no way the software vendors would write a license expiry routine that just plain doesn't work in the current market leading operating system version of the time. –  Majenko May 29 '11 at 16:59

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