Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently in running chkdsk /r on my system drive (platter drive, Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit) I've gotten back "4 EA records processed" and "76 reparse records processed". Am I right in assuming these aren't problematic reports? Do most NTFS system drives report back EA and reparse records processed when chkdsk is run?

share|improve this question
    
Yes is the short answer to your question. –  soandos Jun 3 '11 at 2:49
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is perfectly normal for a chkdsk report.

share|improve this answer
add comment

EA Records are Extended Attribute records. They're a feature of NTFS that allows for a file to have custom extra metadata stored along with it (metadata that is not interpretable to the file system). EA records are a somewhat obscure feature of NTFS that are used very infrequently, but having a few of them doesn't mean that there's anything wrong with your filesystem.

As an interesting side note, EA records are actually intended to support the emulation of OS/2, an early Microsoft operating system that is still used in some legacy systems (support officially ended 2006). Wikipedia notes that some Windows POSIX layers use EA records to store unix permissions fields.

Reparse Records establish Reparse Points within your file system. Reparse Points are a very interesting feature of NTFS that allow a file to be tagged with some data that will essentially result in a program (an FS Filter, sort of like a driver) being run every time you access the file. They're not used a lot, most notably they are used to create symlinks in Windows (via the mklink command) and for volume mount points (this is an obscure feature of Windows that allows you to mount a device as a folder in another device, somewhat like the Unix file system). A normal Windows install will have a number of them that are set up by the installer.

tl;dr: these entries both refer to infrequently used features of NTFS, which is why there's a small number of occurrences of each. They don't indicate any kind of problem with your file system or operating system.

share|improve this answer
    
Great info. I just felt that the other answer more specifically addressed "yes" or "no". –  Lil' Smokey Jun 3 '11 at 17:46
1  
+1 for teaching me what an EA Record is. Thanks! –  user3463 Jun 3 '11 at 18:42
    
I always like over-explaining things, I find the internal workings of the OS very interesting so I talk about them a lot. –  jcrawfordor Jun 3 '11 at 21:15
add comment

This is perfectly OK.

Extended attributes and reparse points aren't exactly widely used by programs, but they are completely normal. Nothing to worry about here. :)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.