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I am using a 64-bit system running Windows 7. I have Open VPN and Tortoise SVN 64-bit installed.

The repository is in a remote system, and we connect using VPN.

I have followed the necessary steps to initiate the VPN connection -

  • Added some project specific config files inside the config folder of the Open VPN installation path.
  • Initiated Open VPN connection using a user.
  • ran Putty's Pageant.exe and added the necessary pass phrase.

Everything fine upto here.

Then I went to the local directory and tried to checkout the remote repository URL using Tortoise SVN. But it throws the following error -

Checkout Failed

To better debug SSH connection problems, remove the -q option from 'ssh' in the [tunnels] section of your Subversion configuration file.
Network connection closed unexpectedly

Following are contents of the [tunnels] section of my Subversion config file -

### Section for configuring tunnel agents.
[tunnels]
### Configure svn protocol tunnel schemes here.  By default, only
### the 'ssh' scheme is defined.  You can define other schemes to
### be used with 'svn+scheme://hostname/path' URLs.  A scheme
### definition is simply a command, optionally prefixed by an
### environment variable name which can override the command if it
### is defined.  The command (or environment variable) may contain
### arguments, using standard shell quoting for arguments with
### spaces.  The command will be invoked as:
###   <command> <hostname> svnserve -t
### (If the URL includes a username, then the hostname will be
### passed to the tunnel agent as <user>@<hostname>.)  If the
### built-in ssh scheme were not predefined, it could be defined
### as:
# ssh = $SVN_SSH ssh
### If you wanted to define a new 'rsh' scheme, to be used with
### 'svn+rsh:' URLs, you could do so as follows:
# rsh = rsh
### Or, if you wanted to specify a full path and arguments:
# rsh = /path/to/rsh -l myusername
### On Windows, if you are specifying a full path to a command,
### use a forward slash (/) or a paired backslash (\\) as the
### path separator.  A single backslash will be treated as an
### escape for the following character.

Is this the section referred to in the error? I can't see any -q option there. What should be done now.

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Uncomment the line:

\# ssh = $SVN_SSH ssh

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