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IPv6 is reasonably easy to setup these days via 6to4 tunneling, but once done, what does one do with it? What interesting services are out there already using IPv6 or providing exclusive features over IPv6? One very basic example would be Google, which provide an animated logo over IPv6:

What else is out there?

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7 Answers 7

There are no interesting uses of IPv6. At the core of it is simply the newer, larger, more expandable version of IPv4. You can do everything that IPv4 can, but you simply have more addresses available for use. So more things can be on the internet at once and more features can be used. It is the future as we reach the limits of v4.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6

The wiki goes into extensive detail on what gets expanded with the v6 version beyond simple address space. The address space expansion is the important core feature. The rest of the features deal with the communication protocol and network traffic details.

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+1 - It is just a new address scheme not a newer better way to actually deliver content. –  EBGreen Aug 25 '09 at 18:52
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The trouble with IPv6 is that its not IPv4 compatible, so its not just a new address scheme that builds on the already existing Internet, but pretty much a completly new and separate Internet and a currently very empty one it seems. –  Grumbel Aug 25 '09 at 18:57
    
That is true. Regardless it is still just an address scheme. –  EBGreen Aug 25 '09 at 18:59
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that pretty much correct. Its similar to adding more digits to our phoen numbers because we ran out of usable numbers. it doesnt really add anything new other than the new users. There is some mobility baked into it that is different and could offer some new uses, and the header structure is more flexible, allowing for future expansion, but that doesnt really apply to you current question. The google page is more of a tidbit/easter egg than a interesting use. Its nothing new, just something they opened only to ipv6 addresses on that subdomain –  Mike M Aug 25 '09 at 19:18
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Soon, your toaster will be on the internet to grab the newest updated perfect toasting times and temperatures to toast your bagel. –  Troggy Aug 25 '09 at 19:26
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Sixxs.net has a list of IPv6 stuff one can play around with:

The most interesting of those is probably the IPv6-only tracker and file upload service:

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Best thing about IPv6 I think are true end to end connections. IE no more NAT hassle.

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Windows 7 Homegroup requires IPv6 so it can probably be called an interesting use

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There's plenty of interesting uses on IPv6.com. Some of the more interesting ones:

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I seem to remember a project to give free porn in order to get people to use it? the site was www.ipv6experiment.com but it is now offline, so here is a archive copy of it (no adult content)

IPV6, it is the future, just not any time soon for mass deployment... Unlike IPv4 where you can figure out the basic network in your head, IPv6 is just so much more complicated for basic things... not saying impossible, just a lot harder than IPv4.

Anyway, back to the topic, apart from the above, I am not really sure there are many interesting uses of IPv6 over anything that can be done on IPv4... in theory it means every object you own can have a public ip address (kettle, oven, fridge and more!) but until there is a real practical reason to do so, there is not really much point... and again, this can be achieved in IPv4, there just isn't really enough for everyone.

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Setting up IPv6 is actually a lot easier then IPv4, as most of the configuration happens automatically and on top of that you don't have to fudge around with the whole NAT stuff. –  Grumbel Aug 25 '09 at 18:59

Well, if you visit http://www.kame.net/ over IPv6, you get the animated swimming Kame instead of the static image you get over IPv4. :-)

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