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I've installed PostgreSQL 9 on Mac OS. I need to change the configuration so that I can access Postgre with the blank password. Searching online yields lots of solutions for older versions of the software, butt I don't know if they apply to the newer version. Many solutions discuss a .conf file of sorts, but the only config files are .conf.sample in the Postgre directories.

My root user now has a blank password. Having this blank password seems to result in an error when I try to connect or set a new password.

I recieve this when trying to connect with the empty password:

psql: fe_sendauth: no password supplied

How can I change the password and/or enable the conf files?

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enabling the config file should be as simple as removing the .sample extension and restarting the postgres server. – Fosco Jul 7 '11 at 13:34

Your PostgreSQL administrator account is most likely postgres. You can log in as postgresql administrator by first becoming postgres mac user sudo -i -u postgres. Then you can access PostgreSQL prompt with psql.

To change administrator password: ALTER USER postgres PASSWORD 'somepassword';.

To allow logging in without password, you need to edit pg_hba.conf, which probably resides in/Library/PostgreSQL/9.0/data/pg_hba.conf.

I use ident authentication to allow mac user jkj to log in as PostgreSQL user jkj without password.

# TYPE  DATABASE  USER  CIDR-ADDRESS  METHOD
local   all       jkj                 ident

Remember that you first have to create your username in PostgreSQL. It can be a superuser.

createuser -s jkj
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When trying to run psql, I am prompted for a password. The blank password returns psql: fe_sendauth: no password supplied. – Moshe Jul 7 '11 at 13:47

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