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On Windows 7 Ultimate, is there a way to see when I logged on into the current session?

I want to find out how long I have been at the PC / when I started it up.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Use the following command in a Command Prompt:

net user [username]

It will be next to Last Logon.

EDIT
If your screen becomes locked and you use the method above it will display the last time the screen was unlocked. You will have to use this command below to get the initial login time:

quser
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4  
+1: "Net Statistics" tells you when the computer booted, not when the user logged in. –  Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Jul 13 '11 at 16:03

i am not a computerwizard, i am regularly using a utility may be it will help you login timer showing the system boot time here link http://logintimer.weebly.com

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2  
This does exactly the same as the built-in quser, but is commercial. –  slhck Oct 26 '12 at 12:44

You can also use

systeminfo

and next to

System Boot Time:

It will be in the format

9/17/2011, 10:16:38 PM
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Use the command:

net stats srv

Where it says statistics since... is when you logged on/booted up.

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You can also use

quser

to see the login time.

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1  
Nice, that's a new one to me. Turns out it's a 'shortcut' to another usable option: C:\>query user. –  Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Jul 13 '11 at 16:52

Do this at a command line, I think it will show what you want:

net statistics server

The "Statistics since 7/12/2011 6:28:15 PM" line is the last time the computer was rebooted.

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Go to the command prompt and type:

net statistics srv
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perfect, thanks –  atticae Jul 13 '11 at 15:55

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