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In the Outlook 2010 calendar, if you double click a timeslot you will create an appointment by default. Is there a way to create a meeting request by default instead?

(Meeting requests have attendees, appointments don't)

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3 Answers 3

Instead of double-clicking on a time slot, right-click on it and select meeting request from the popup menu. After a little while, this will become second nature for you.

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Personally, I don't this is a helpful alternative as the user expressed the desire to double click to quickly create the meeting. Shital's answer was a much better alternative. –  Sly Raskal Aug 8 '13 at 20:23

Its late but might help others who are searching for the same. You can still use double click on the time slot and by default you will get appointment request. Then you should be able to click on the "Invite" button in the appointment tab to convert it to a meeting request. If you don't see Invite button then try maximizing the buttons bar (in the mac, its at the right hand corner of the appointment tab. See http://mac2.microsoft.com/help/office/14/en-us/outlook/item/79c17be2-28ff-4f0f-a691-2dfbe559e133

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Although I have a strong knowledge of many aspects of network administration, e-mail is kind of my specialty, and I did not think this was possible, but I checked fairly deeply to confirm that. Here is what I did:

I just looked all around my copy, then did a number of Google searches, including for:

"default calendar new meeting outlook" (minus the quotes) "default new meeting outlook" "options new meeting outlook:

Nothing significant was returned.

Sorry, but I don't think you will find what you are looking for.

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