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I have a system on which multiple operating systems are installed. Let's say:

C: Windows
D: Linux

I have a bootable USB drive, using which I can boot both into to Windows and Linux. I don't want to use this USB drive any more.

Is there any way I can create the same image as that of the USB drive on a new partition (e.g. E:), so that the system will then boot from that partition?

Please don't advise me to install Grub or some other popular multi-OS selectors; I have to boot from my own partition having the same image as the USB drive.

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Can't you just create an image of the USB, then copy it to the partition? –  soandos Aug 16 '11 at 23:49
    
what do u mean by image of usb? you mean iso? how to write iso to partition? –  coure2011 Aug 16 '11 at 23:51
    
Well you have to create the ISO first, but then yes, write the ISO to the partition. –  soandos Aug 17 '11 at 0:05
3  
You still need a bootloader in the master boot record of the hard disk, or none of the partitons will be found. –  Joe Internet Aug 17 '11 at 0:48

2 Answers 2

MY first suggestion might be to go the hardware route and simply remove the hard drive from it's case and do a little swapping. However that doesn't the desired operation. Another suggestion might be to use the windows PE tools along with the imageX imaging software that is rather easy to find. you can go into all sorts of ideas from there with the other programs therein.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/ee530017

This link might help you get started if collecting an image is your desired direction.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I restored bootable image to partition from which I want to boot my system. Then I mark that partition active, now I can boot into it.

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