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I'm developing some kind of software that displays a 3d view-port. I've just tested it on a 3d Sony Bravia screen and it works (using side-by-side 3d display) and looks amazing.

I'm looking for a way to use a multi-screen setup with two or three screens that will each show a different 3d image using the same method.

The problem as I see it is that the TVs send a sync signal to the user's active glasses, and are not necessarily synced between them.

Is there a way to sync the TVs ? is it even necessary ?

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2 Answers

You can do this but it will require you creating custom cables for your TVs.

You only need one emitter to control the shutter glasses and that feeds back into your graphics card, not the TV. It's the graphics card that's in control here.

The vertical sync signal from one of the the graphics card outputs will need to be split and then that fed into each monitor instead of the vertical sync signal from its own output. The simplest way to do this would be to build a box that has 2 (or 3) inputs and 2 (or 3) outputs. The VSYNC from the master would be wired to all outputs, the VSYNC from the others simply not used.

Then plug the outputs from your graphics cards into the inputs of the box and the outputs of the box into your monitors.

As long as both outputs are synchronised at the computer then the displays should be synchronised.

I know this will work as we did this across multiple PCs when I was working for a company that did realtime 3D graphics back in 2000.

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Is there a way to sync the TVs ?

No; unless you were to wire them and get them to sync to the first monitor ; although this requires you to do some electronics. You could however attempt to get them started at the same time, or try to reboot the out of sync monitor till it is in sync...

Is it even necessary?

Yes, when monitor 1 displays 100% left 0% right; then monitor 2 could display 25% left 75% right.

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