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Is it safe to assume that recommended on-load and idle temperature of laptop is same as desktop?

I feel I know the range of desktop's HDD, GPU and CPU ideal temperature. Can this knowledge be applied to test laptop's temperature?

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In my experience, it's not comparable. On paper, the laptop and the desktop motherboards may look the same, but the laptop has the added issues of limited ventilation, which makes the computer heat up faster. The graphics are integrated as well, which would worsen the lack of ventilation by concentrating the heat so much.

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yeah I need to know recommended temp for laptop then. Does that vary?! –  TPR Aug 25 '11 at 1:27
    
My laptop reports itself as 48.5 C right now and the palmrests are hot enough to be handwarmers, if that helps. –  digitxp Aug 25 '11 at 1:38
    
when you say laptop, you mean core, right? what's your HDD temp? –  TPR Aug 25 '11 at 1:39
    
That's the temperature ACPI reports. The HDD reports 44 C. –  digitxp Aug 25 '11 at 1:42
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Is it safe to assume that recommended on-load and idle temperature of laptop is same as desktop?

No. Do not make hardware assumptions in regards to temperatures, especially when you can find this information readily available on the internet. Look up the datasheet for your particular processor (or family of processors), and there will be all the information you need in the section detailing thermal specifications.

Generally a processor can operate outside of it's maximum temperature range, but it will have a severely degraded lifespan. I have seen some laptop CPUs have a maximum temp of 72C, and some at 90C. It all depends on your particular hardware.

I feel I know the range of desktop's HDD, GPU and CPU ideal temperature. Can this knowledge be applied to test laptop's temperature?

In general, yes. As long as you know the thermal limits of the system's components, you can use the same monitoring tools, and same guidelines for keeping the system cool. Hard drives, for example, will have the same general operating temperature range. GPUs, on the other hand, follow the same trend as CPUs - check the datasheet or the manufacturer's website and you will find the safe temperature range.

Just remember, however, that laptops have significantly less efficient cooling systems. They keep all of the components in a very tight configuration, and it is difficult to move enough air over the components both efficiently, and quietly.

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