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When i use that option, music is increased in volume which is good, since otherwise music on my laptop does not sound loud or how i want it to sound even with all controls on max. However so far i have spotted on application where this has reverse effect - Winamp. While everywhere else music sounds loud, it sounds less loud in Winamp.

To better know what i am talking about, here is the video.

So i have to constantly enable disable option depending what i am listening/watching to.

FYI: I have IDT Audio Control Panel.

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1 Answer 1

A loudness equalization simply normalizes the audio signal. You can modify Winamp's equalizer to increase the overall audio gain to compensate for this (there is a main slider beside all of the ones to set individual frequency range gains). Just slide this up a few decibels to compensate for the perceived reduction in volume (normalizing a song does not change the average volume of the signal).

Each application implements a normalization algorithm differently, and some amplify the signal before or afterwards. Normalizing most songs will result in a either a perceived volume reduction or gain, depending on the audio signal itself.

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Not really increases that much as it would with "Loudness Equalization". I think there is something else involved here. –  Boris_yo Aug 26 '11 at 6:24
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@Boris_yo You can drastically increase the volume with the equalizer gain. It will probably max out your speakers if you set it to the top. –  Breakthrough Aug 26 '11 at 12:53
    
Maxed everything but does not increase volume that much with loudness equalization enabled and disabled. Maybe it increases drastically if you have powerful speakers and not laptop speakers. –  Boris_yo Aug 27 '11 at 7:10

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