Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Fedora 15 with the latest updates on a HP Mini 210 Netbook.

My internet was working fine. Then all of a sudden it stopped working on my Fedora netbook. I also have an iMac and can connect that to the internet without any problem. So my Internet connection is working fine on the iMac.

However, when I put the cable in my Fedora netbook. I get the IP address through DHCP and DNS automatically. This is the same setting as my iMac. I also have a Windows partition on my Fedora netbook. That works fine, so there is no hardware problems.

I can ping the router fine, but cannot ping www.google.com or browse any websites.

nslookup google.com returns "cannot find host name google.com". So I think there is something wrong with the DNS.

resolv.conf doens't have any DNS address, as they are assigned using DHCP.

Could anyone tell me some steps to take to try and solve this problem?

share|improve this question
2  
if they were assigned by dhcp they would still show up in resolv.conf try editing it manually –  Shutupsquare Aug 25 '11 at 16:03
1  
PS can you ping 8.8.8.8? –  Shutupsquare Aug 25 '11 at 16:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If DHCP is not properly assigning your DNS, you can manually edit resolv.conf to include, oh,

nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4

or you could substitute the IP address of your router, e.g. 192.168.1.1

The two servers listed above are public DNS servers provided by Google, which are supposed to automatically provide very fast service based on your geographic/network location.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that worked. I added that directly into the resolv.conf file and restart NetworkManager. –  ant2009 Aug 25 '11 at 16:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.