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I have several SVN repositories on an Windows network fileshare. The user has full control, read, write, and just about every other permission that can be added. When trying to commit he gets the error:

Can't open file '//fileshare/svnrepos/projectname/db/txn-current-lock': Permission denied

It's being accessed via file:///, which I know is badbadterrible svn user but I don't know how else to set it up given I am not an admin and this fileshare is all we have available.

I've dug around a bit and been told I need to be using snvserve, but we don't have svnserve running on the remote share. I can try executing it from my machine but it just hangs, never prints anything. I can't install or really do much to the remote machine.

I know it would be better to have this on an svn server, but to get this up and running in the mean time, what do I need to look at? (And ideally, how could I get an svnserver going? Would I need to talk to some of the admins that take care of that share?)

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2 Answers

Say, I logged in as "Kelvin" and I am in Administrators group with full controls.

I run the VisualSVN server using "Use Windows authentication -> Basic authentication"

In VisualSVN server, under Repossitories -> Properties -> Security, add my "Kelvin", Admin group, and VisualSVN service accounts into it with Read/Write permission.

Most Important Here

Then I go to "C:\Prpositories" folder -> properties -> Security. Check my permission under the name "Kelvin", for some VERY STRANGE reasons, my account "Kelvin" did not have "Write" permission here. GIVE MYSELF Full control. Try again. Now, the problem -- Can't open file '//fileshare/svnrepos/projectname/db/txn-current-lock': Permission denied -- will go away.

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what do I need to look at?

[...] Permission denied

That should ring a bell. As big as a church bell.

Just right-click on the repository folder and use the Security tab. You might need to check the sub folders in the repository, too.

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<quote> [...] The user has full control, read, write, and just about every other permission that can be added [...] </quote> –  trycatch Aug 30 '11 at 13:50
    
Remember that there are 2 sets of permissions: One on the share and one on the files/directories themselves. –  Turbo J Aug 31 '11 at 0:02
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