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What happened to the B: drive in Windows and why does the hard drive default to C?
Can I install Windows 7 in A:\ or B:\ partition names?

This question is similar to this one: What happened to the B: drive in Windows and why does the hard drive default to C? but a bit different.

I understand why C drive uses that letter back in the days of Floppy Disk. But floppy disk are no longer used. So why is it in a brand new computer the hard drive is still labeled as C drive vs starting at A and then working down.

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marked as duplicate by techie007, Lance Roberts, Lynda, MaQleod, Wuffers Sep 3 '11 at 2:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This should be closed as between those two post answer this. I saw this first post but missed the other one. Thanks => –  Lynda Sep 2 '11 at 23:43
    
Also directly related - What are the Windows A: and B: drives used for? –  techie007 Sep 3 '11 at 0:11
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you've seen in the other question, lots of computers in the early days had two floppy drives, so they were A: and B:.

It became an industry standard, and there's no real reason to change it. Everyone is used to the C: drive being the main drive, and there is still a lot of software out there that depends on it.

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I did not think about the software aspect and drive letters. Thanks => –  Lynda Sep 2 '11 at 23:40
    
Many computer only had 1 floppy drive. Having 2 floppy drives was a luxury for a while. Hard drives didnt become standard till much later. –  Keltari Sep 3 '11 at 1:27
    
@Keltari, yep, I started on Apple II+s with just one big drive. And it was many years later until two floppy drives was standard. –  Lance Roberts Sep 3 '11 at 1:48
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