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I'm attempting to recover data for someone and was given a backup hard drive filled with .IAB files. I've searched Google and have tried tar and gunzip on OS X 10.6 but with no success.

How can I get these files back? Any free options, whether UI or CLI, would be okay.

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Something like Trid would be helpful here, at least to correctly identify what kind of compressed archive it is. – Isxek Sep 4 '11 at 21:44
    
According to Google it's "Iomega Automatic Backup" (restoring from which might be tricky). – grawity Sep 4 '11 at 21:52

Iomega Automatic Backup Pro's method of backing up files (if you have selected to do it unencrypted) is just the original files with an extra 17 bytes prepended to them and a bit of renaming.

This handy bash command could help with stripping those bytes out on Linux and changing the file names back to the originals.

find infolder/ -name '*.IAB' -type f -exec sh -c 'FILE=`basename "{}" .IAB | sed -re "s/^0\.//"`; DIR=`dirname "{}"`; OUT="outfolder/$DIR/$FILE"; mkdir -p "outfolder/$DIR"; dd if="{}" bs=17 skip=1 of="$OUT"' \; 

Source: https://perltravels.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/ok-its-not-good-start-that-first-post.html

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bs=17 is a very small buffer and it may slow down the operation. This answer introduces the trick with three instances of dd in a pipe. I think you can reduce it to two instances by properly using ibs and obs options. – Kamil Maciorowski Jun 22 at 9:24

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