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What is the difference between &> and >& in bash?

tldp did not mention the latter one. Is it really a redirection operator?

Or does someone know a more complete tutorial?

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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

From the bash man page:

There  are  two  formats  for  redirecting standard output and standard
   error:

          &>word
   and
          >&word

   Of the two forms, the first is preferred.  This is semantically equiva-
   lent to

          >word 2>&1

Read the redirection section of the bash man page.

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In bash, >&word and &>word (preferred syntax) redirects standard output and standard error to the same place. This is equivalent to >word 2>&1. Look it up in the bash manual.

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man bash says

       There  are  two  formats  for  redirecting standard output and standard error:

              &>word
       and
              >&word

       Of the two forms, the first is preferred.  This is semantically equiva-
       lent to

              >word 2>&1
share|improve this answer
add comment

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