Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a computer and its Motherboard has two LAN Ports like in this image:

enter image description here

I have two other computers that I would like to connect to this computer.
How should i do this?

share|improve this question
1  
You should also look to work on your accept rate. A 0% accept rate isn't exactly peachy. If people are giving you correct answers then mark them as so. Otherwise you may wish to alert people in chat that you're still struggling with a problem, post the answer yourself if you find it somewhere else, or when you have more reputation consider awarding bounties - See here for more info -> superuser.com/privileges/set-bounties –  Joe Taylor Sep 17 '11 at 22:32
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the Internet connection is not important, all you need is a pair of crossover UTP cable. Then, connect server with the client PC's, and configure IP's on every host. Simplest way, is to go with something like

  • 10.0.0.1 for server
  • 10.0.0.2 for PC1
  • 10.0.0.3 for PC2

For such network, mask is not very important, but you must use max. 29 bit mask (255.255.255.248). This mask MUST be the same on every host (both server and clients). You don't need to set up default gateway nor DNS servers.

And done.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for helping but server has two Ethernet port i should assign 10.0.0.1 for both of them? –  Milad Sobhkhiz Sep 17 '11 at 20:29
1  
Damn, right. Each interface must have its own IP address, so on server i.e. eth0 - 10.0.0.1, eth1 - 10.0.0.2 –  mcmajk3l Sep 17 '11 at 20:34
    
is important to use crossOver cable? –  Milad Sobhkhiz Sep 17 '11 at 20:39
1  
It depends on cards installed on your device. If they support auto mdi(x), it's not necessary to use crossover. If not, simple, straight-through cable won't even work. Best way to check this, is to connect two of these computers with a straight-through cable. When LED's won't even blink - you need crossover. ;) –  mcmajk3l Sep 17 '11 at 20:44
1  
I'd recommend using a hub or switch, if you want each computer to be able to talk to the other. –  Daniel R Hicks Sep 17 '11 at 21:02
show 2 more comments

If you want this computer connected to the internet then you will have to connect all three up to a switch, if the server, or other device on the networkm is acting as a DHCP then they will pick up addresses from that, if not you will have to assign them.

You could also mess about connecting the LAN ports of the 3 PC's with ethernet cables (Might have to be crossover cables depending on the NIC's available) Set the IP addresses into a correct range and they should all be able to communicate with each other.

share|improve this answer
    
Easiest is the router/switch, which you can pick up from a store. Or get one used from Craigslist for practically nothing. –  Keltari Sep 17 '11 at 19:43
    
No. internet is not important. –  Milad Sobhkhiz Sep 17 '11 at 19:47
    
I want just connect thise clients to this server and i request you for say step by step –  Milad Sobhkhiz Sep 17 '11 at 19:48
3  
For step-by-step, we're gonna need to know the Operating Systems on the server and the two other computers –  Canadian Luke Sep 17 '11 at 19:53
    
i want know about networking steps. –  Milad Sobhkhiz Sep 17 '11 at 20:08
show 3 more comments

You do not need to set interfaces to correct addresses unless you are using a Server Operating System which has default IP addressing TURNED OFF. By default, workstation operating systems - Linux, OSX, Windows, have default IP addressing TURNED ON. (and it's been that way for many years now). EVEN IF THERE IS NO DHCP MODEM/ROUTER, workstations by default will all choose interoperable IP addresses and subnet.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.