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I don't know if the word "precondition" makes sense, but sounded cooler.

For example. I open Google News and then click on several news stories from different websites. Let's say two websites out of three open in the same Google News processes, but the third doesn't. All of these websites are unrelated to each other.

The question comes after I intended to pin some bookmarked tabs in my browser, I was thinking I could optimize performance by pinning tabs. I expected they would open in the same process at startup. But this is not the case.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is covered in the Google Chrome FAQ:

  1. How can my web page open a new tab in a separate process?

Google Chrome has a multi-process architecture, meaning that tabs can run in separate processes from each other and from the main browser process. New tabs spawned from a web page, however, are usually opened in the same process, so that the original page can access the new tab using JavaScript.

However, Google Chrome will look for hints to open new tabs in a separate process, if you are navigating the new tab to a different website.

The easiest approach is to use a link to a different website that targets a new window without passing on referrer information. Google Chrome recognises this as a hint to keep the new page isolated from the original page and it will load the new page in a separate process.

Examples and more info here:

http://www.google.com/chrome/intl/en-GB/webmasters-faq.html#newtab

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