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How do I limit the RAM which my OS sees without physically removing it from the machine ?

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What are you hoping to accomplish by doing this? –  Shinrai Oct 7 '11 at 17:42
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Is there anything in this question that isn't subset of your previous question? –  AndrejaKo Oct 7 '11 at 17:51
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What OS is this? Most OSes have a way to limit the RAM they see. Otherwise, run the OS in a virtual machine. –  David Schwartz Oct 7 '11 at 20:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For Windows OSes, there's some switches that can be set depending on which version you're running to limit the amount of RAM that the OS can use: /maxmem and /burnmemory in the boot.ini file for 2000, XP, & 2003, and removememory and truncatememory in the BCD for Vista/7. The switches have slightly different behaviors that you have to be careful of.

For Linux, I'm sure there's some kernel switch that can be added to your bootloader to accomplish the same thing.

For other OSes, it's entirely up in the air.

Would those accomplish what you want?

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you can also do this in windows by firing up System Configuration. –  surfasb Oct 7 '11 at 22:39
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You can install it in a Virtual Server, and it will partition out the memory you've allocated to the Operating system.

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Unless your BIOS supports doing this somehow (and I can't think of one that does) you can't do this.

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I've seen BIOSes that support it in some Dell Workstations and Servers, however the limit wasn't granular. You could toggle a value to limit the system to reporting something like 256 MB. On or off, that was it. –  afrazier Oct 7 '11 at 17:45
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