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Using windows 7 I find that MS-Word is reffering to the system settings to interpret data. In one of the apps I use, a date is exported with a 2 digit year, even though the setting in that application is explicitly 4 digits. In the additional settings from the controlpanel (region / language) I see that I can change the date range with the limitation that only the upper year is adjustable and not the lower value. as a standard it is 1930 / 2029. having dates in the export of before 1930 these dates are displayed a being from the 21st century. Somebody born in 1923 now still has to be born (date of birth displayed as 2023 LOL) Is there a way to change BOTH values independent from each other?

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Haven't we learned from 2K and not to use two digit years?? –  surfasb Oct 14 '11 at 10:41
    
@surfasb: Sadly, many people haven't learned, and some very young people are even being taught to use two-digit years in elementary school. Unfortunately for the industry in general, it appears that this problem will continue for many years to come (I wish this wasn't the case). =( –  Randolf Richardson Oct 25 '11 at 20:23
    
@RandolfRichardson: Please put me out of my misery. . . –  surfasb Oct 25 '11 at 21:33
    
@surfasb: Assisted Suicide is not legal in Canada (and I'm not a Doctor). Sorry, I can't help with that. =O –  Randolf Richardson Oct 26 '11 at 3:35

1 Answer 1

No. The reason is that you're specifying a 100 year range to use for interpreting two-digit years. When you update the year, the whole range is updated automatically.

The reason for supporting a two-digit year is for "year 2000 compliance." Although many people are still using the last two digits of the year when expressing dates, this feature makes it possible for this to work in a functional, user-friendly manner.

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