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I have a laptop that I resized its partition to only fit the data. After that I had about `700 MB of free space left. Computer booted and it worked fine. I tried it a couple more times and it was fine. I thought it was good to go in regards to cloning so I proceeded to image the drive with Clonezilla on default settings.

After that, I formatted the drive and attempted to restore the image (using all default options) to verify it. Well, this is where my problem resides: when I try to boot, I just get that little blinking cursor at the top left.

What I tried:

  • I went into my Windows 7 DVD disk and tried the Startup repair. It said that it was successful in repairing it, but still had the same problem. Tried it 5 more times, to no avail.
  • Tried bootrec /fixboot, /fixmbr, /rebuildbcd. Still nothing.
  • Tried bootsect /nt60 sys /mbr. Can u guess, yea same thing?
  • Tried setting the partition to "Active" in diskpart.
  • Tried deleting the "boot" folder and even "bootmgr" and replacing them from the DVD.

Luckily, I have Hiren's BootCD on my USB and booted into it. I selected the "Boot from Windows 7/Vista (bootmgr)" option and it worked. The image was successfully booted. It booted off the bootmgr in Hiren's BootCD. It still worked but I need the bootmgr to work without the assistance of the BootCD.

How the hell do I fix this mess?


Update:

I found the solution. I was just sitting down, studying for my exams when an idea popped in my head. What if I delete all BCD entries manually then add a fresh one after? Well that's what I did.

  1. Booted into installation DVD
  2. Went into command prompt
  3. Typed bcdedit /enum
  4. Ran bcdedit /deletevalue (whatever value it was) for each value in the BCD
  5. Ran bootrec /scanos and verified that my OS was located
  6. Finally, ran bootrec /rebuildbcd
  7. And the computer boots up fine.
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2  
The name for the "little blinking thing" is a cursor. –  JdeBP Oct 31 '11 at 10:29
    
Lol thanks for the heads up. –  Chris Tarazi Oct 31 '11 at 20:48
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4 Answers

I've had a ton of success with SuperGrub2, Even more then with Window's startup repair. I'd give that guy a try. Despite its name it can fix a Windows MBR without installing Grub.

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Didnt work for me. Thx anyway. –  Chris Tarazi Oct 31 '11 at 21:54
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For your sake, I hope that the backup was not damaged. It is always a good idea to take two backups, just in case, and to verify them. Clonezilla has a checksum option, other products have real verification against the disk.

You say nothing about the partitioning of the disk and whether you had multi-boot or a boot manager other than that of Windows 7 (such as GRUB). Including this info in the post would be useful.

Could you also take a look at this CloneZilla article and tell us whether you had done exactly the same as described.

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I've done all the default steps. –  Chris Tarazi Nov 2 '11 at 21:17
    
Please add to your post the configuration of your disk before formatting. (Apropos, why did you reformat?) –  harrymc Nov 2 '11 at 21:57
    
I wanted a fresh install. Cloning the computer would give me the option of going back to the previous OS if I needed to. –  Chris Tarazi Nov 2 '11 at 23:20
    
Without additional info about the disk configuration, the only advice left to give you is to do this fresh install. –  harrymc Nov 3 '11 at 5:51
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It's worth resizing the partition once the image is deployed and increasing it... It may well be that Windows virtual memory needs more free space than that (did you change the setting in 'System Properties/Advanced system settings/Performance/Advanced' before you downsized?)

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I didnt change any setting. But the baffling thing is that it can boot off the Hiren BootCD's bootmgr option. –  Chris Tarazi Nov 2 '11 at 21:15
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Wow, I found the solution. I was just sitting down, studying for my exams when an idea popped in my head. What if I delete all BCD entries manually then add a fresh one after? Well that's what I did.

  1. Booted into installation DVD
  2. Went into command prompt
  3. Typed bcdedit /enum
  4. Ran bcdedit /deletevalue (whatever value it was) for each value in the BCD
  5. Ran bootrec /scanos and verified that my OS was located
  6. Finally, ran bootrec /rebuildbcd
  7. And the computer boots up fine.

Thanks for all the answers and suggestions.

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