Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I need to do a sweep of the office to see where the wireless dead-zones are located so I can get new wireless access points as needed. You see those cool devices in movies that sweep all the air for everything, I won't need something like that. Are there any utilities that would do this? I know of a few but they are very watered down. The utility can be for either Windows or Linux.

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

inSSIDer might be what you're looking for. From the website:

YOU CAN
– Inspect your Wi-Fi and surrounding networks
– Scan and filter hundreds of nearby access points
– Troubleshoot competing access points and clogged Wi-Fi channels
– Highlight access points for areas with high Wi-Fi concentration
– Track the strength of received signals in dBm over time
– Sort results by MAC Address, SSID, Channel, RSSI, Time Last Seen
– Export Wi-Fi and GPS data to a KML file in Google Earth


FEATURES
– Uses your current wireless card and connection software
– Works with Windows XP, Vista, and 7 (32 and 64 bit)
– Compatible with most GPS devices (NMEA v2.3 +)

And it's free. I've used it loads in the past and it's a great little tool (no, I don't work for them). Get it here

share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect! Thanks. I will mark as answer once the timeout expires. – qroberts Nov 15 '11 at 15:30

I've used Ekahau in the past and was happy with it, it makes a nice heatmap, and can even be used to locate hot spots.

http://www.ekahau.com/products/heatmapper/overview.html

share|improve this answer
    
I will give this a shot too. Will look good to show fellow managers. – qroberts Nov 15 '11 at 16:37

I've used this smart phone app with great success:

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.farproc.wifi.analyzer&hl=en

I had an old version for iPod (before it was pulled from the app store for using undocumented apis) and really liked it.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks nifty as well. Sadly, I do not have an Android OS based phone (nor do I have a smartphone). – qroberts Nov 15 '11 at 15:34

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .