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These type of fonts are popular in embedded devices, like phones. I managed to find guides from Symbian and MSDN documentation sites, but what I want is to open an .ltt file that I downloaded (the original typeface of my SE W508). This is possible? A software to do this exists?

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I think LTT are just renamed TTF's that Sony Ericson uses. Have you tried renaming it to .TTF and see if it can be opened as a standard font? –  techie007 Nov 22 '11 at 1:45
    
@techie007 Yep, I've tried, but no success. –  Fitoschido Nov 25 '11 at 14:34
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+100

Quickly looking around, I found this which is probably the same LTT font format you are asking about. ( https://developer.brewmp.com/resources/tech-guides/fonts-features-technology-guide/creating-and-using-fonts-brew-mp-applications/creating-custom-linkedtruety ) which claims:

Note: Linked fonts are a proprietary font format of Monotype Imaging. For more information, please refer to http://www.monotypeimaging.com/markets/LinkedFonts.aspx.

And at that location I see this:

Font linking allows developers to remove data redundancy and more flexibly manage the font memory footprint of consumer electronic devices. Through font linking, a grouping of fonts can be treated as a single font, without having to merge multiple font files.

Which implies that the font files are not part of the LTT file format (i.e. the file is like a packing list, instructing applications which parts of what fonts to use when). The font files may be elsewhere on the device, possibly in the same folder as the LTT file (or in an archive/container format).

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I’m inclined to believe the LTT file is like a ZIP archive, that contains various font files embedded into one. So, is there a way to ‘unpack’ the linked font files included inside the LTT? I suppose no, because it is a proprietary tecnology. Thanks for the links. –  Fitoschido Dec 24 '11 at 2:22
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