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Is there a way to make Outlook 2003 send an email at a specific time rather than immediately?

Say, after an hour.

XP, Outlook 2003

Thanks,

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Click the Options icon in a new message, you will see a "Do Not Deliver Before" checkbox.

Set the time to one hour in the future.

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+1 plus accept. Thanks. – Xavierjazz Nov 21 '11 at 23:21

You can use a rule to delay sending of all messages by pre-determined periods of time.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/delay-or-schedule-sending-e-mail-messages-HP005242790.aspx

1.On the Tools menu, click Rules and Alerts, and then click New Rule.

2.Select Start from a blank rule.

3.In the Step 1: Select when messages should be checked box, click Check messages after sending, and then click Next.

4.In the Step 1: Select condition(s) list, select any options you want, and then click Next. If you do not select any check boxes, a confirmation dialog box appears. Clicking Yes applies this rule to all messages you send.

5.In the Step 1: Select action(s) list, select defer delivery by a number of minutes. Delivery can be delayed up to two hours.

6.In the Step 2: Edit the rule description (click on an underlined value) box, click the underlined phrase a number of and enter the number of minutes you want messages held before sending.

7.Click OK, and then click Next.

8.Select any exceptions, and then click Next.

9.In the Step 1: Specify a name for this rule box, type a name for the rule.

10.Click Finish.

This applies to Outlook 2010, 2007, and 2003 that I know of.

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+1 Thanks. I selected the other answer as it was specific rather than general, but yours is a fine answer. – Xavierjazz Nov 21 '11 at 23:22

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