Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I was configuring accounts of users in Open Suse 11.3 from Yast. I knew the password of each one, but the problem is that when I went into Yast User and Group Management there was six asterisks in the password input. I ignore that, i though it was the password I set before.

But when I went into lockscreen, I typed the password and it does not work, so I guess that the password have been change to that Yast default.

The question is, what is that password?

share|improve this question
1  
There is no default password, and since unix systems never store the original password, those asterisks were probably dummy characters to show that there was a password present but the system had literally no idea what is was or how many there were. I suspect you inadvertently changed the password and didn't realize you had. You will probably need to use a recovery root shell and passwd -u eversor from the command line to reset it to a new value. I do not have any experience with Suse directly but this is true of every unix since about 1970. – msw Dec 1 '11 at 12:27
    
Are you now locked out of your system - is that what you need help with? – Paul Dec 1 '11 at 22:51
    
@msw i fixed it the problem was I accidentally disable login for those users instead of disabling auto login – eversor Dec 2 '11 at 8:45
    
Please don't add "[Solved]" to your title. Add an answer that explains what the solution was, or if it's not a real problem just delete the question. – ChrisF Dec 2 '11 at 9:05
    
Feel free to answer your own question (in the answer box, below) and mark it as accepted if you are happy wit it. – sblair Dec 2 '11 at 9:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem was I disabled login instead of disabling auto login.

share|improve this answer

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .