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How can I cancel CHKDSK in progress in Windows 7, without rebooting the computer or terminating the process against its will?

EDIT 2: Why? It was going to take an hour, and was already in the free space section of my drive, and the drive was dismounted (/R option), and I needed access to the drive to get back to work.

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Can I move it or do I have to wait for an admin? –  Matthew Doucette Dec 6 '11 at 15:08
    
You can re-ask it over there, but I'd just wait. It will be moved automatically when it gets to 5 votes –  Jon Egerton Dec 6 '11 at 15:10
    
The real question is: why do you want to do it? –  PeeHaa Dec 6 '11 at 16:45
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There is no safe way to terminate a chkdsk in progress, even if you do it will run at the next reboot since it sets the dirty bit when you run the command. There is no good reason to do this unless the PC is locked up during a chkdsk. –  Moab Dec 6 '11 at 19:41
    
Does this answer help? –  AndrejaKo Dec 7 '11 at 7:01
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Dec 6 '11 at 16:23

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3 Answers

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There is no safe way to terminate a chkdsk in progress. Even if you do, it will run at the next reboot since it sets the dirty bit when you run the command. There is no good reason to cancel chkdsk this way, unless the PC is locked up during a chkdsk.

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The command that Dude provided should exclude the drive from the check at boot-time. I haven't tested this, so I can't guarantee it will work. This of course, does not answer the question of how to safely terminate a chkdsk in progress. –  sammyg Mar 17 at 12:27
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You can use this as a last resort in case all else fails:

chkntfs /x C:

What this does:

Excludes a drive from the default boot-time check. Excluded drives are not accumulated between command invocations.

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CTRL+C should work.

Another option would be to pause the process (Process Explorer for example) and let it run when you're no longer working on it. Don't quite see why killing the process would be that bad.

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How do you pause it? –  Canadian Luke Dec 7 '11 at 18:07
    
CTRL+C does not work, unfortunately. And pausing it, if you can, would not relinquish the drive if it is locked out (dismounted), which happens when you use CHKDSK with certain parameters. –  Matthew Doucette Dec 7 '11 at 19:45
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